Category Archives: Care Provider

Keep Your Brain Healthy!

BrainAt First Care, we understand that our clients have a variety of health issues, which sometimes prohibits them from being the same person they once were. We also understand that they want to continue to live freely, independently and with the same energy and fervor that makes them happy. It is with this in mind that we include articles like this one about keeping a person’s brain stimulated as they age. The goal is to give you subtle tips that will keep you and your loved ones sharp and active physically as well as mentally. The information in this article is courtesy of Mary Desaulniers, author of the article “How to SuperCharge an Aging Brain”.
A study at the Bay Crest Centre for Geriatric Care found that as people age, their ability to focus on one activity in one part of the brain decreases, which explains why older people are easily “distracted”. Yet this distraction suggests that different areas of the brain are working simultaneously, which explains why older people can often access higher reasoning processes (such as intuition) by using both hemispheres at the same time. Like any other muscle, the brain can only function at its peak capacity when it is used consistently. What are the steps we can take to ensure a strong and healthy brain in our later years?
• Pursue leisure activities. Read books and magazines. Knit with friends, go for a walk, play bridge. Leisure activities can reduce the risk or delay the onset of dementia.
• Read and write Poetry. In the famous Nuns’ Study, researchers concluded that the sisters who had more resilient brains later in life were the ones who tended to use multi-syllabic words and richer vocabularies in their diary entries. Those who developed dementia tended to use simple, monosyllabic words.
• Exercise and a healthy diet. Exercise creates significant differences in the grey and white matter areas of the brain. Aging brings about a shrinking of these areas that cardiovascular exercise actually slows down. Eat whole grains and legumes as these are rich in lecithin. Eat fish, high in omega 3 fatty acids (good fats), which have anti-inflammatory properties that can prevent the formation of plaques in the brain. Have 5-7 servings of fruits and vegetables for their powerful anti-oxidant benefits and increase your consumption of Soy Protein, rich in phytonutrients and gives you all the benefits of protein without the fat.
• Learn new things and take risks. Evidence shows that learning new activities (starting a new project, hobby, business or venture) is exactly what is needed to prevent the loss of myelin in the brain.
• Love and enjoy what you have. Be thankful for the abundance you have been blessed with and give generously to those you can serve. A positive sense of purpose and a healthy optimism can do wonders to ensure longevity in the brain. Take Advantage of the possibilities!
To learn more visit: http://goarticles.com/article/How-to-Supercharge-an-Aging-Brain/148053/
Always keep in mind that if you or a loved one is in need of assistance with activities of daily living such as: light cooking, cleaning or even medication reminders, we are here to help! Please contact Exclusive Care, so that one of our enrollment specialists can assist you in the process of obtaining services. We can be reached at 718-364-4032 from the hours of 9am-5pm, or email us at info@exclusive-care.com.

5 Things You Should Tell Your New Home Care Provider

Being a caregiver for an aging parent can be overwhelming. Whether your loved one requires skilled nursing care, rehabilitation therapies or assistance with activities of daily living, home care services provide family caregivers a moment of relaxation and peace of mind. However, there are some things you should make your care provider aware of before you start services. This will ensure that you are getting quality care and will help us create a plan of care that will fit your specific needs.

Emergency Contacts. Provide a list of emergency phone numbers including: yourself, other key family members, the patient’s doctor, local hospitals, home care nurses and therapists, local police and fire.

Medications. When a new homecare provider comes into the home, the patient will receive medication reconciliation from a nurse. Because home care aides can only remind a patient to take their medications, creating a schedule that lists: what prescriptions to take, when and the correct dosage will reduce medication errors.

Meal Preparations. Home care aides are available to prepare meals for patients and families. Explain how your loved one: likes their food prepared, portion sizes, dietary issues, or food allergies. The more details given, the better the care provided. It helps ensure your loved one is cared for to your standards.

Transfers. If your loved one needs assistance getting out of their bed or in the bathroom, assistive devices are available. They can be covered under insurance or Medicare and can help reduce falls or broken bones.

Activities. If your loved one is still independent and just needs companionship, discuss what they like to do. Do they enjoy playing games, watching television, listening to the radio, or taking a walk outside? The more details your homecare provider knows about the patient, the better care they can deliver.

If you or a loved one is in need of assistance with activities of daily living such as: light cooking, cleaning or even medication reminders! Please contact Excluisive Care. so that one of our enrollment specialists can assist you in the process of obtaining services. We can be reached at 718-364-4032 from the hours of 9am-5pm, or email us at info@exclusive-care.com.